Roy of Superior Art Creations archive
Date : August 17, 2006

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Blog Moved

Categories: Blogging, Personal
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Published on: August 17, 2006

Quick News. I moved my Blog from Cumbrowski.com to the new RoySAC.com domain (where I moved already all my pages about ANSI and ASCII Text art to less than 2 weeks ago).The new Blog URL is http://www.RoySAC.com/blogThe Feedburner Feed URL did not change. Also all existing Links to the Old Address should work without problem. I 301-redirected everything from the old address to the new one.While I was moving the Blog, did I add the option to subscribe to my Blog via Email as little form in the upper right hand corner of my Blog. The old FeedBlitz subscriptions should continue to work in the near future, but I would suggest you sign up again at my blog and unsubscribe from FeedBlitz, just in case.If you notice anything weird, let me know. Cheers!

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ASCIIs that are NOT ASCIIs – or are they?

Categories: ANSI, ASCII, history, Oldskool
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Published on: August 17, 2006

It wasn’t the first time that somebody said to me, that one of my “ASCIIs” is labeled wrong as such and should be labeled “ANSI”.He was referring to what is also called a “Block ASCII”. He is right and wrong with his comment and I will try to explain that.The Extended IBM Code Pages (Code page 437 in the US and 850 in Germany) are part of the 8-Bit DOS character set and a proprietary (ANSI) standard by IBM.The Extended Code pages include several special Graphical Characters that go beyond the 7-bit US-Character set of 128 characters supported by any other Operating System on the PC and Mainframe including MAC, Unix and Linux.Those special Characters are considered ASCII by most people that owned and used a PC (especially the PC Demo, Underground Art and Warez Scenes). It was referred to them as “High ASCII” or “Block ASCII” although they are technically not ASCII. Only the 128 characters that are part of the 7-bit US-Character set are truly ASCII.ANSIs on the other hand were called documents (are called) that used special Escape Sequences for color coding and other features.These documents require the ANSI.sys driver being loaded in order to view the document correctly. ANSI.sys was not required to display “plain” “High ASCII” characters.Because of that and the stupid name Microsoft gave the driver to display .ANS files (ANSI.sys), did Tens of thousand (if not more) of people on the IBM PC and compatible classify ASCII and ANSI the way they did[…]

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